For author bookings, media events, and general press activities, please contact Linda Muzzarelli at 954.370.9153 or via our contact form.  In the meantime, please feel free to browse some of our latest press releases below. 

Paleo Diet Potentially Dangerous, Says Researcher - November 22, 2013

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For immediate release Contact: Linda Muzzarelli
Lindam@consumerpress.com
954.370.9153

FoodSmart Nutrition Book Wins Second Award, Continues To Gain Widespread Appeal

FORT LAUDERDALE, FL (NewsReleaseWire) October 28, 2010 -- FoodSmart: Understanding Nutrition in the 21st Century by noted nutrition researcher and FoodSmart Alliance founder Diana Hunter has been awarded the National Best Books 2010 Award in Health. The title, which also won this year's National Indie Excellence Award in Nutrition, presents an unconventional approach to learning about food both in concept and layout, has been gaining recognition as a beneficial resource among consumers, students, parents, and others since last August. Its launch was not without risks, however.
“Developing a book that doesn’t follow the norm of what most reviewers are used to is risky,” says Hunter. “But in order to help a greater number of people understand nutrition, I knew we had to take a chance.”
In FoodSmart, Hunter teaches how to recognize basic variables associated with particular foods so people can make their own choices about what to consume based on their individual life circumstances. She emphasizes that nutrition can’t be confined to a “one size fits all” approach.
“Everyone is different,” states Hunter. “Many people have sensitivities, intolerances, allergies, or diseases, or are on one or more medications. Some are faced with a combination of these situations. You can’t effectively provide blanket nutrition advice.”
FoodSmart covers a wide variety of nutrition-related topics including dieting, organics, sweeteners, supplements, food irradiation, genetically modified (GMO) foods, and food safety, along with essential information on food marketing to children and life-cycle nutrition from pre-birth through adulthood. The book also provides pros and cons for many commonly consumed foods, along with useful listings of food and drug interactions, regulatory contacts, and safe food storage durations. Its unconventional format includes large top and bottom page margins, same-page footnotes, a chapter set up as an A-to-Z glossary of sweeteners, and a Q & A chapter on organics, among other things.
Hunter, who is currently on her “Be FoodSmart” national tour, has made hundreds of public and media appearances across the country educating both adults and children on how to make healthful yet tasty nutritional choices.
“I’m on a mission to change how America eats,” says Hunter. “Losing weight and eating healthy, delicious foods are a lot easier than people think, and the benefits are many. My goal is to help them see that.”
For more information visit FoodSmart.org.
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For immediate release Contact: Linda Muzzarelli
Lindam@consumerpress.com
954.370.9153


Eating Disorders In Kids Linked To Role Models' Preoccupation With Weight
Comments, Actions Can Have Long-Term Consequences


FORT LAUDERDALE, FL (NewsReleaseWire) July 8, 2010 -- Parents and other role models who are obsessed with their weight often promote the development of eating disorders in kids, says nutrition researcher and FoodSmart Alliance founder Diana Hunter. Exposing kids to negative comments about food, body weight and body shape on a continual basis sets the stage for self-introspection and altered eating habits. The problem is compounded when children are also targeted about their own weight. The result can be lifelong health problems, both mental and physical.
Hunter notes that many people don't realize the impact their food-related comments and actions can have on kids. Her goal is to make them aware of the potential for eating disorders at a young age and how they may "accidentally" be contributing to their development. One of her main concerns is that the problem is growing.
"Hardly a day goes by when I don't hear a mom, teacher, babysitter or older sister talking about how fat they are and how they need to lose weight in front of a younger child," says Hunter. "The sad thing is many of them are not even overweight."
Other actions that can adversely affect kids' views on food and eating include constant dieting, excessive exercising and the continued use of diet aids, though Hunter warns that there are also a variety of closely related external factors to consider.
"Commercials and ads for weight loss plans and products don't help the situation, and neither do ultra-thin models and actresses," states Hunter." They just put more pressure on kids. Add harassment about weight from other kids to all of these factors, and you've got a recipe for disaster." The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) reports that as many as 10 million females and 1 million males in the U.S. are fighting a life and death battle with an eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia. Symptoms can begin as early as kindergarten.
Hunter, who is currently on her "Be FoodSmart" national tour, says the number of children under ten years of age who have eating disorders is increasing. During one recent presentation twenty-one female adults had questions for the researcher, six of which were about eating disorders in very young females.
"This topic now comes up everywhere I speak, and with more prevalence," says Hunter. "It's disheartening. This is an area that needs serious attention."
Hunter suggests doing the following to help kids avoid eating disorders:
• Teach kids about good nutrition from the earliest age possible
• Teach kids how to make sound food choices in spite of advertising
• Involve kids in food shopping and preparation
• Foster good eating habits and set a good example
• Avoid making negative comments about food whenever possible
• Promote a positive self image for yourself and your kids

For more information visit FoodSmart.org.

Diana Hunter is an award-winning author and nutritional researcher. She is currently on national tour with her latest award-winning title, FoodSmart: Understanding Nutrition in the 21st Century.

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For immediate release
Contact: Linda Muzzarelli
Lindam@consumerpress.com
954.370.9153

Mead Johnson’s Flavored Toddler Formulas Draw Criticism Products Likely To Promote Obesity, Says Nutrition Researcher

FORT LAUDERDALE, FL (NewsReleaseWire) May 8, 2010 — Mead Johnson Nutrition Company’s new vanilla- and chocolate-flavored Enfagrow™ Premium toddler formulas have come under fire for their potential to cause childhood -- and even adult -- obesity. According to nutrition researcher and FoodSmart Alliance founder Diana Hunter, introducing sweet, flavored formulas into toddlers’ diets is highly likely to set the stage for similar taste preferences throughout life. This, she says, can promote obesity not only in childhood, but also throughout the teen years and into adulthood.
“Many overweight and obese children become overweight adults,” states Hunter. “Introducing a beverage that’s similar in flavor and sweetness to vanilla or chocolate milk, malts, or shakes -- particularly when it’s presented as a main staple in a toddler’s daily diet -- creates a dietary pattern that can lead to the consumption of a lot of fat and empty calories down the road. It simply isn’t the best nutritional option.”
Hunter also warns that cocoa, which is found in the chocolate-flavored formula, may cause health issues including anxiety, stomach upset, and headaches in some children.
“Cocoa contains varying amounts of caffeine, theobromine and theophylline, which can have greater effects on children’s developing bodies than those of adults,” she notes. “Parents and caretakers should be aware of that.”
Hunter further notes that although the toddler formulas contain omega-3 DHA, prebiotics, and other beneficial dietary components, these can also be obtained from other sources. She recommends that parents learn about all available food, beverage, and supplement options and discuss them with their toddler’s pediatrician before making nutritional choices.
“The bottom line is that parents have control,” states Hunter. “I recommend teaching kids which foods promote good health and which ones don’t, and then putting your money where their mouth is. Combine that with making sure they have sufficient sleep, exercise, hydration, and quality time and you provide them with a life plan for good health.’”
Hunter, who is currently on her “Be FoodSmart” national tour, has made hundreds of public and media appearances across the country teaching both adults and children how to make healthful yet tasty nutritional choices.
For more information visit FoodSmart.org.
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For immediate release Contact: Linda Muzzarelli
Lindam@consumerpress.com
954.370.9153

Nutrition Researcher Blasts Happy Meal Toy Ban Deems Ordinance “Worthless, Misdirected”

FORT LAUDERDALE, FL (May 2, 2010) -- The development of an ordinance to ban toys from kids’ meals that do not meet specific nutritional standards is a “worthless, misdirected effort that may in fact boost kid’s meal sales and the incidence of childhood obesity” according to nutrition researcher and FoodSmart Alliance founder Diana Hunter. The ordinance, approved by California’s Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors in a 3-2 vote, is aimed at reducing childhood obesity. It may, however, have the opposite effect.
“Putting so much media emphasis on Happy Meals and other kids’ meals could very likely increase sales,” says Hunter. “And what’s stopping the restaurants from selling the toys separately?”
Hunter also notes that removing the toys from the meals may cause kids to want other less-healthy foods that contain toys, such as high-sugar, low fiber cereals that contain artificial ingredients, or to seek toys from other sources while continuing to eat the meals.
“Think of all the toys hanging at a child’s eye level in the grocery store in virtually every aisle,” Hunter remarks. “Are we going to force supermarkets to remove all of those too?”
Another consideration Hunter brings to light is that there are many instances in which kids ask for a kids’ meal only to obtain a certain toy and then only eat a portion, if any, of the food. She cites a child’s overall diet as the source needing change, and says parents and caretakers are at the helm of controlling childhood obesity – not government.
So what’s a better approach to conquering childhood obesity?
“It’s pretty simple,” states Hunter. “Just teach your kids which foods promote good health and which ones don’t, and then put your money where their mouth is. Combine that with making sure they have sufficient sleep, exercise, hydration, and quality time and you provide them with a life plan for good health..”
Hunter, who is currently on her “Be FoodSmart” national tour, has made hundreds of public and media appearances across the country teaching both adults and children how to make healthful yet tasty nutritional choices.
For more information visit FoodSmart.org.

Diana Hunter is a nutrition researcher and award-winning author. She is currently on national tour with her latest title, FoodSmart: Understanding Nutrition in the 21st Century.
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For immediate release Contact: Linda Muzzarelli
Lindam@consumerpress.com
954.370.9153


Walmart Meat Labeling Poses Health Risks For Consumers

Nutrition Researcher Pushes For Change
The wording on labels of various solution-treated pork and poultry available in Wal-Mart stores across the country has come under fire for being too small and often illegible. According to noted nutrition researcher and FoodSmart Alliance founder Diana Hunter, the situation not only creates inconvenience for those who inadvertently choose the meats due to their inconspicuous labeling, but also poses health risks for consumers.

The meats in question have the wording “Tenderness and Moistness Enhanced with up to a 12% solution” in fine print beneath each meat’s description on the labels. Far from making the meats tender, however, Hunter notes that the solution causes them to have a rubbery texture and require a longer cooking time.

“Because these meats tend to take longer to cook, it raises the potential for them to be eaten partially raw or undercooked, which in turn raises the potential for food borne illnesses,” states Hunter.

Hunter also cites the fact that while Americans are being strongly advised to cut back on salt intake, they don’t need it pre-added to their meats.

“How is the public supposed to cut back on salt when it’s being added to foods it isn’t expected to be in, especially when it’s not obvious on the label?” she asks. “The majority of these meats have more than quadruple the amount of sodium found in untreated pork and poultry. It’s a serious issue.”

When marinades, sauces, or spice mixtures containing sodium are added to the meat by consumers, the sodium content increases further.

“This is particularly scary for people with high blood pressure, especially those who are elderly and have less capacity for taste due to diminishing taste buds, and for those with congestive heart failure and certain liver and kidney diseases,” says Hunter.
The fact that Wal-Mart has a large following of grocery consumers, including those who buy meats at the company’s Sam’s Club warehouses, heightens these concerns.

“Walmart needs to prominently and clearly display the fact that a meat has been treated with a salt-based solution so consumers are readily aware of it and can easily make educated choices,” says Hunter. “It’s the responsible thing to do.”

Calls made to Wal-Mart's corporate headquarters on Wednesday regarding these issues were not returned as of Friday afternoon.

Diana Hunter is a nutrition researcher and award-winning author. She is currently on national tour with her latest title, FoodSmart: Understanding Nutrition in the 21st Century.
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For immediate release Contact: Linda Muzzarelli
Lindam@consumerpress.com
954.370.9153

Vitamin D Deficiency Likely Major Factor In Osteoporosis Development

FORT LAUDERDALE, FL (NewsReleaseWire) February 1, 2010 -- Increases in the incidence of vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. are likely to be a major contributing factor in the escalating number of cases of osteoporosis, says noted nutrition researcher Diana Hunter.

While a number of causes, including low estrogen levels in women, low testosterone levels in men, thyroid problems, smoking, lack of exercise, and low calcium levels are attributed to the development of the disease, a lack of vitamin D may in fact play an even larger role than previously thought due to the nutrient's hormonal activity in the body.

"Numerous studies have shown a relationship between vitamin D and estrogen," states Hunter. "Its effect on various other hormones in the body, however, is somewhat less clear. Since this nutrient is actually a hormone that interacts not only with nutrients, but also with other hormones, it's likely to have a greater overall impact on bone mass than we currently realize."

According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF), 10 million individuals in the U.S. today are estimated to already have osteoporosis and almost 34 million more are estimated to have low bone mass, placing them at increased risk for developing the disease. NOF also notes that there has been a five-fold increase in medical office visits for osteoporosis (from 1.3 to 6.3 million) over the past 10 years.

Vitamin D plays an essential role in both bone development and maintenance. It can be obtained from eggs, milk, cheese, salmon, and other foods, as well as from supplements. It also forms in the body when the skin is exposed to ultraviolet light such as sunlight, though the amount obtained in this way can vary significantly. A deficiency is known to affect calcium absorption, which in turn can lead to bone deformity problems and osteoporosis.

In addition to vitamin D and calcium, other nutrients essential to good bone health include phosphorus, potassium, copper, magnesium, manganese, fluoride, zinc, and vitamins A, C and K.

“It’s a synergy,” says Hunter. “Each of the components work together. When even one of them is missing, bone development and maintenance can be impaired. The fact that vitamin D acts as a hormone simply adds to the importance of maintaining a sufficient level in the body.”

Hunter stresses that while meeting nutritional needs for bone development is essential during the formative years, it is no less important at any other life stage.

“While our nutrient needs change, they always exist,” notes Hunter. “Preventing osteoporosis is a lifelong goal.”

Diana Hunter is a nutrition researcher and award-winning author. She is currently on national tour with her latest title, FoodSmart: Understanding Nutrition in the 21st Century.
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December 17, 2009
For immediate release Contact: Linda Muzzarelli
Lindam@consumerpress.com
954.370.9153

School Lunches Present Challenges In Fight Against Childhood Obesity

Healthier Options, Joint Effort Needed For Positive Change
FORT LAUDERDALE, FL (NewsReleaseWire) December 17, 2009 ― The vast availability of high-fat, high-sugar, and high-calorie foods in school cafeterias across the country has come under fire as an obstacle in preventing and treating childhood obesity. Parents, teachers, and children alike have voiced concern over the types of foods being offered and the overall lack of healthier alternative choices ¾not only for overweight and obese kids, but for all kids.

“Fried foods, highly processed foods, and foods high in fat and sugar just don't cut it,” says nutrition researcher Diana Hunter. “Kids need whole foods and foods that contain moderate amounts of healthy fats. They need options that taste good and are good for them ― and they need to be taught the nutritional value of individual foods so they are able to make better choices."

Like many others, Hunter also notes that school vending machines filled with junk foods and high-sugar drinks add to the problem. She further notes that when kids also eat breakfasts at school and are provided classroom snacks, the situation is often intensified.

From another perspective, Hunter points out that when parents send kids to school with junk-filled lunches and provide them with a less-than-healthy overall diet at home they aren't giving kids the tools they need to make better food choices at school. She emphasizes that it’s critically important for parents to find and provide nutritionally sound foods their kids actually like.

"Changes need to be made," remarks Hunter. "That’s where parents, teachers, and school boards come in. It needs to be a united effort.”

Hunter suggests the following to help kids make better nutritional choices and avoid overeating:

• Teach kids about good nutrition from the earliest age possible

• Teach kids how to make sound food choices in spite of advertising

• Take kids shopping and teach them how to read labels

• Involve kids in making home lunches

• Foster good eating habits and set a good example

• Teach kids safe food preparation
For more information visit FoodSmart.org.

Diana Hunter is an award-winning author and nutritional researcher. She is currently on national tour with her latest title, FoodSmart: Understanding Nutrition in the 21st Century.

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For immediate release...

Contact Linda Muzzarelli 954.370.9153
Lindam@consumerpress.com 

FoodSmart Author Diana Hunter Begins National Tour 

FORT LAUDERDALE, FL (August 12, 2009) — Award-winning author Diana Hunter will commence her “Be FoodSmart” national tour featuring FoodSmart: Understanding Nutrition in the 21st Century beginning August 20th, 2009. The tour begins on the east coast from Florida to Maine through October 2009, followed by the midwest through December 2009, and the west and south coasts beginning January 2010.

Hunter, who presents an unconventional, enlightening, and entertaining look at nutrition, provides a unique, easy-to-grasp concept on how to make sense of conflicting nutritional information and make informed dietary choices. Her goal is to help educate others about nutrition and health on a global scale. In FoodSmart she covers a wide variety of both traditional and current nutritional topics, including irradiated and genetically modified foods, dieting, organics, sweeteners, and supplements. The book also includes food and drug interactions, food safety issues, and food storage durations.

Hunter’s approach is based on empowering people to learn about nutrition and how it affects them individually.

“The more people who can answer ‘Yes’ to the question ‘Are you FoodSmart?’ the healthier we will become as a nation and as a planet,” she states.

For appearance dates and times check with your local bookstores, health food stores, colleges, and universities or call 954.370.9153.

http://www.foodsmart.org

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Looking For Straight Answers To Today's Food-Related Questions?
Nationally noted author Diana Hunter provides a unique overview on how to easily make sense of conflicting nutrition information and make educated dietary choices. Covers a wide variety of nutritional topics including dieting, organics, irradiated foods, sweeteners, genetically modified foods, food safety, and more.

FoodSmart: Understanding Nutrition in the 21st Century 
is an informative, easy-to-read guide designed to help you make sense of conflicting nutritional information and make educated dietary choices. Both enlightening and entertaining, it covers a wide variety of nutrition-related topics.

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